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Steakhouse-Quality Pan-Seared New York Strip Steak

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Want to know the secret to cooking a cast iron New York strip at home like those served at fancy steakhouse restaurants? This steak recipe delivers a Perfect Pan-Seared New York Strip every time — without any special marinade and without firing up the grill!

Simply seasoned with sea salt and cracked black pepper, this cast iron strip steak gets a nice char from cooking first on top of the stove and gets its finish in a 400-degree oven.

Literally, all you need for this delicious steak dinner is a couple of steaks seasoned with sea salt and cracked black pepper, a touch of olive oil, and a hot cast iron skillet. Pretty simple, right?

Perfect Pan-Seared New York Strip

Pan-Seared New York Strip Steak

My guy is the meat-and-potatoes type. There’s nothing he enjoys more than manning the grill, and we certainly do our fair share of grilling whenever the weather cooperates. Given a choice, he’d ask for beef for dinner almost every time.

So, it’s a good thing we both enjoy a good steak. This pan searing method works great for us during the cooler months when it’s too cool to grill outdoors.

Often, we’d prefer to cook at home rather than dining out—especially when we find a recipe that works for us as well as this Perfect Pan-Seared New York Strip!

New York Strip prepared in cast iron is delicious and it’s more economical than a decent steak house. Plus, we get to spend time cooking together in the kitchen, and believe it or not, sometimes that can be romantic!

New York Strip resting at room temperature

What is a strip steak?

Strip steaks are cut from the short loin, a lean and tender portion of beef. When the butcher cuts the tip for filet mignon steaks, what remains is the long strip. With the bone in, this cut is known as T-bone steak.

When the bone is removed, it is known as New York Strip. Leave the filet and strip intact and you have a Porterhouse steak.

Why is it called New York strip steak?

Also known as the ambassador steak or Kansas City strip, the most common nickname for the strip steak is New York Strip. This name was coined after famous New York city steakhouses helped make this cut of beef extremely popular.

How to cook a steak in cast iron

  1. Choose steaks that are an inch and a half or thicker for the best results.
  2. There’s no need to marinate the steaks, but you do need to allow them to come to room temperature before you start cooking, about 30 to 45 minutes.
  3. While you are waiting, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. It’s important that it has time to come to the correct temperature before you’re ready to let the oven finish off the steaks.
  4. Just before cooking, season the steaks with sea salt and cracked black pepper, rubbing it in on both sides, and then baste with a small amount of olive oil.
  5. Heat a cast iron skillet on top of the stove. Once the cast iron skillet is hot (not smoking), you’re ready to sear the steaks. All is takes is 2 minutes on each side. The goal is to get a good crust, so don’t be tempted to flip the steaks before the 2 minutes is up!
  6. Pop the cast iron into the oven to finish cooking and in minutes you have a delicious steak dinner! (See the recipe below for the detailed step-by-step directions.)

Touch test guide

You can gently press tongs into the cooked steak to determine its doneness with this touch test guide. To be totally accurate, use a quick read digital thermometer.

  • RARE: 120°F – cool, bright red center and soft to the touch
  • MEDIUM RARE: 130°F – warm, red center and beginning to firm up with red juices
  • MEDIUM: 145-155°F – slightly pink center, completely firm with brown juices
  • WELL DONE: 155-160°F – very little or no pink, firm to the touch
Perfect Pan-Seared New York Strip in cast iron pan
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For the best results, I recommend using a well-seasoned cast iron skillet. It holds the heat well, plus it’s great for searing the steaks quickly. Also, be sure you have a set of long-handle tongs to make turning these steaks easier and safer!

Perfect Pan-Seared New York Strip in cast iron with mushrooms

Here are a few of my favorite delicious date night recipes to make at home.

  • Braised Beef Short Ribs with Gnocchi — Carve out an afternoon to let this fantastic dinner of Braised Beef Short Ribs simmer slowly in a dutch oven while you nestle up with a good book. 
  • Easy Grilled Steak Fajitas for Two — A red curry paste marinade and fresh avocado crema make for tasty and easy grilled steak fajitas at home.
  • Brown Butter Scallops — Sea scallops pan-seared in butter get their finishing touch from a flavorful brown butter sauce enhanced with garlic, capers, and fresh-squeezed lemon juice for a truly gourmet dinner.
  • Honey Soy Salmon — A flavorful weeknight meal of Asian-inspired sweet, flaky salmon with crisp roasted Brussel sprouts and butternut squash. 
  • Mongolian Glazed Steak — Mongolian Glazed Grilled Steak has a thin, crispy coating and a tangy barbecue glaze.
  • French Onion Soup — Slowly caramelized onions are the secret to delicious Soupe à L’oignon Gratinée (better known on this side of the pond as French Onion Soup).
Perfect Pan-Seared New York Strip on cobalt plate with mushrooms

Best way to cook a new York strip steak on the stove

Because we like sautéed mushrooms with our steaks, I add a cup of sliced mushrooms with a little extra butter to the skillet at the end of cooking. Steam or roast asparagus while the steaks cook and you have a complete dinner worthy of a date night at home!

Also remember, once steaks are removed from the oven they will continue cooking. Tenting with aluminum foil for a couple of minutes will help keep the steaks warm while sealing in the juices,

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Yield: 2 servings

Pan-Seared New York Strip Steak

Pan-Seared New York Strip Steak

No fancy marinades required for this Perfect Pan-Seared New York Strip. Seasoned with sea salt and cracked black pepper, these steaks get a nice char in a hot cast iron skillet.

Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Additional Time 2 minutes
Total Time 47 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 1-inch to 1-1/2-inch thick cuts New York Strip Steaks, fat trimmed
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • Sea salt
  • Cracked black pepper
  • 1 clove garlic, sliced
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoons butter, unsalted

Instructions

  1. Thirty minutes before cooking, remove steaks from refrigerator and allow to come to room temperature.
  2. Preheat the oven to 400°F.
  3. Heat a large cast iron skillet over medium high heat until it is hot, but not smoking.
  4. While skillet is heating up, season both sides of steak with sea salt and pepper. Drizzle steaks with olive oil and gently rub in the salt and pepper.
  5. Place seasoned steaks into hot skillet and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, without turning, to get a nice sear. Turn steaks using tongs and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes to sear other side.
  6. Remove cast iron skillet from heat and add sliced mushrooms, garlic, and butter. Immediately place skillet in preheated oven and roast for 4 to 7 minutes, or until desired temperature is reached. Use touch test* or use a digital thermometer to gauge steak temperature.
  7. Remove steaks from oven and tent with foil, allowing steaks to rest for a couple of minutes before serving.

Notes

You can gently press tongs into the cooked steak to determine its doneness with this touch test guide. To be totally accurate, use a quick read digital thermometer.

  • RARE: 120°F – cool, bright red center and soft to the touch
  • MEDIUM RARE: 130°F – warm, red center and beginning to firm up with red juices
  • MEDIUM: 145-155°F – slightly pink center, completely firm with brown juices
  • WELL DONE: 155-160°F – very little or no pink, firm to the touch

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Nutrition Information:

Yield:

2

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 366Total Fat: 31gSaturated Fat: 14gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 14gCholesterol: 81mgSodium: 335mgCarbohydrates: 5gFiber: 2gSugar: 2gProtein: 19g

Did you make this recipe?

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ABOUT SHEILA
Sheila Thigpen, author of Easy Chicken Cookbook and The 5-Ingredient Fresh and Easy Cookbook, is a recipe developer, food photographer, and food writer. She spent 20+ years as a business manager in the publishing industry before she retired in 2018 to focus on her passions — cooking, photography, and writing. Living near the beautiful Smoky Mountains, Sheila and her husband have two adult daughters and two fine sons-in-law, are active in their church, love to travel, and have a precious little granddaughter who has stolen their hearts. Follow Sheila on YouTubePinterestInstagramFacebook, and Twitter!

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Lisa

Friday 11th of September 2020

Followed the recipe to a T... allowed for thickness of steaks, cooked for 7 minutes in the oven after searing, temp was 145... but steaks were rare, not medium. Maybe my oven is off? Will do it again, but will let them stay in the oven a bit longer. Thanks!

Sheila Thigpen

Saturday 12th of September 2020

Hi, Lisa. The only thing I can think of is that it’s really important that your oven has time to preheat to the correct temperature (400 degrees) before you’re ready to put the steaks into the oven to finish them off. Of course, if the steak isn't quite cooked to the internal temperature you prefer, just leave them in the oven for another minute or two next time.

TRINA

Saturday 6th of June 2020

Ok, I am floored, this was absolutely delicious. I am 55 years old and have never ever in my life made a steak that was good(I truly had given up). I always cooked them too long and never let them sit out at room temperature for at least 30 minutes before cooking. I followed your recipe to a "T" and even used the same mushrooms. This was a late graduation dinner for my 17 year old son; and let me tell you it was a hit! He said "Mom you did good." This recipe has been pinned, and will go into my regular rotation from now on. Thank you a million times over. This is the gold standard for making the perfect steak.

Dianne

Monday 11th of May 2020

I have never liked cooking my own steak on the stove or in the oven. Now I know why. I always simply cooked it too long. BUT...Your recipe is simple and absolutely delicious! Thank you for sharing — I have to go now and eat this awesome steak with onions and peppers and roasted potatoes. :)

Stacy

Monday 3rd of February 2020

So I do exactly this. But do you continue to put oven on bake for 400 or you also mentioned roast? Thank you

Sheila Thigpen

Tuesday 4th of February 2020

Stacy, set the oven temperature to 400 degrees, and finish the steaks at that temperature for the final cooking step. I see that I used both terms and am sorry for any confusion!

Jay Franke

Thursday 2nd of January 2020

Just made this last night (had 2 NY Strips (about 18 oz/steak). I preheated the pan in the oven (while it preheated). When I was ready to "ccok," removed the pan to a med-high burner, waited a few minutes and dropped in the steaks. Cooked as directed for 3 min/side, added the mushrooms, etc. and placed the pan back into the oven for 5 min. Tested the steaks and removed them to a cool plate and tented lightly. Missed the double resting? They came out more medium-less rare (almost overcooked for my son & I). Will drop a minute next time. But a great method and you get saute'd mushrooms for very little work. Thanks.

Sheila Thigpen

Thursday 2nd of January 2020

Hi, Jay. The cast iron pan should be heated first on top of the stove, not in the oven, so I think perhaps the pan was a lot hotter when you did the first sear on the stovetop. Also, the cook time in the oven is 4 - 7 minutes, depending on your preferred steak temp. Definitely go with less time for a medium rare steak next time, but I'm glad you liked this cooking method!

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